Thoughts & Notes
theeconomist:

Daily chart: which countries have the happiest people? The world is happier than before the financial crisis. The most cheeful citizens tend to live in poor and middle-income countries, while the gloomiest are in rich ones.

theeconomist:

Daily chart: which countries have the happiest people? The world is happier than before the financial crisis. The most cheeful citizens tend to live in poor and middle-income countries, while the gloomiest are in rich ones.

"It is a little bit like the end of a dictatorship when everybody suddenly discovers they were against the dictator".
Sage allows those students who are more interested in math than malloc() to spend more time thinking about math and less time figuring out why their code segfaults…

Sage - Why use Sage?

This made me laugh.

Sage sounds like a great tool for exploring maths. And Cython which was extracted from it sounds like a great tool for exploratory programming of all kinds, with the option to easily ramp up performance from Python levels to C levels where needed. And without spending half the time worrying about malloc and segfaults.

Going to grad school’s a suicide mission…. At Yale, we were overjoyed if half our graduating students found positions.
Korean teenagers are by far the unhappiest in the rich world. This is the result of society’s relentless focus on education—or rather, exam results.
In Korea suicide is now the leading cause of death among those aged 15-24. Is the cramming culture to blame? (via theeconomist)
When people give you advice, they’re really just talking to themselves in the past.

Austin Kleon (via marco)

Often times this is true. But not often enough to make it a universal excuse for ignoring advice. A better application of the insight is to beware of giving advice that doesn’t fit the advisee’s situation, but only your own past screw ups.

Another tipping/micropayment system, and an interesting one. Does this one have any more chance than the others like Tipjoy?

On the plus side:

Looks like a lot of thought has gone into making it quick and painless to use for both would-be-tippers and content creators.

Tipping can be as simple as bookmarking or tweeting a site would be.

There seems to be good integration with popular sites like Wordpress, Blogger and YouTube, and it looks like people who publish in such places have to do next to nothing to claim any tips for their work.

It is a non-profit, which is promising in itself and also seems to solve certain problems like transaction charges eating up too much of small tips. (Looks like Paypal doesn’t charge non-profits.)

On the minus side:

There is the usual problem of gaining traction and critical mass. There’s no point using a system that no-one’s using. And at the start, of course no one is using it. As of this moment they have 50 twitter followers.

Hard to see how it will ever gain any visibility, and therefore a big enough user base for it to be worthwhile to use. There are no big names involved and there’s apparently no money behind it.

I could not discover anything about who the founders are or why I should trust them, esp when money is involved. One of them, Dave Fogel, has a Tumblr with absolutely nothing in it, and a Twitter with 8 tweets and 11 followers. The other Eric Ferraiuolo is a little bit more visible, but still not very much so. (His entire “About Me” says: “I make web stuff”. And the last post at this time starts jokingly “If this whole web developer thing doesn’t work out…”)

Since 100% of tips go to the sites that users choose, hard to see how the org will support itself if it does take off and therefore need serious resources.

Also various mentions about terms that sites have to comply with to be eligible, like content being freely accessible. Good intentions, but how does verifying anything like that scale up?

Finally, will the non-profit status hold up if the site becomes big? For example, it’s not clear that the people and works that would be beneficiaries of this would fit the criteria of what non-profits can support.

Conclusion:

Overall, while I’d love for something like this to succeed, it’s hard to see how it will gain enough momentum. And if it does manage to do that, scaling up is liable to break the model.

Hopefully they’ll find some backing that will help deal with these issues, and it will somehow turn out.

For now, this post is my input on what I think needs to be addressed if this is to succeed. Which, as I said, I’d love to see happen.

fred-wilson:

fascinating
It’s a photo finish: Android, BlackBerry and iOS are tied in US smartphone share | Wireless News - Betanews
Snowy scenes at the Emirates Stadium
BBC Sport - Football - Saturday’s football photos

Snowy scenes at the Emirates Stadium

BBC Sport - Football - Saturday’s football photos